Wednesday, 18 December 2013

Airport Dog


 


I called her "Airport Dog", having first seen her near the airport, Fresh Creek, Andros Island, Bahamas. Having decided to chronicle her pictorial story I wrote:

"Living in the "Family Islands" with a rescue state of mind can prove to be quite frustrating most times. Here, there is no rescue support facility available nor ready access to Veterinary services. In recent weeks, I've seen as I transit North on Queen's Highway this girl that I'll call "Airport Dog" for now, wandering up and down Queen's Highway near the Fresh Creek Airport. I've wondered where her pups were and how she was caring for them. Today's transit was no different, except I realized that she had not had her pups yet. I stopped. She's cautious and really not so feral. Hungry and could probably easily be caught ... I think. But then what? Without being able to transfer her to a proper carrier, she couldn't be sent to Nassau by plane. Trap her right before the Fast Ferry leaves the dock in Fresh Creek is a possibility. Wondering out loud because I want to do something for her, need to do something.....but what?"

Having committed to volunteer on a remote Spay/Neuter Campaign that I would soon have to depart for and that I have a hard time with near term Spays that result in aborting almost fully developed puppies, I called my dear friend Laura Kimble, Chairman, Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness (Baark!) to discuss what to do. I embraced her thoughts, knowing that during a spay procedure that involves a pregnant female, that the pups will actually feel no pain are and in fact peacefully relieved of an uncertain life of roaming, hunger, disease and despair.

She had her pups while I was away and later I learned that her pups had been found and that four of them had been taken from her while they were just under four weeks of age. I convinced one young man that they would not survive without her and paid him to go get them and turn them over to me. As I write, I am well aware of my arrogance and feel the brunt of shame as this story unfolds.

I worried that the remainder would be found and experience a life of being chained or roped to a tree as is common place here in the Islands. Imagine my joy when on a stop to feed Airport Dog, I heard her remaining pups whimpering in the distant bush. For those who don't know, the bush of Andros can be very unforgiving. I found them, I thought there were three, but four remaining pups were found in and around a deep muddy pit in the bush. I betrayed her fragile trust and took the remaining four, emerging bloodied by the bush experience but with pups embraced.

The next weeks were about asking grateful, happy and seemingly healthy puppies to please let me walk as they danced around my feet so full of life...but then....shy lil bruder (there were three "lil bruders", one "lil sista", Bruder and Sista)...didn't seem to be feeling well...ok...he was shy so no reason to fret. The next morning, he was dead. I don't know why....puppy #1 buried.....I called my Vet Friend and told him what I was experiencing and he asked me if they had been wormed....no...so that was the next step.  lil Bruder #2 passed next without warning over night...lil sista and Bruda took ill quickly there after....I woke that next morning to see lil sista had perished and Bruder laying over her seemingly comforting her although he was clearly in distress. I decided that he would have to be put on a the next plane (which didn't leave Andros until 4 pm) to Nassau to save his life, but by noon it was clear that he would not make that plane. I sat with him and attempted to comfort him as he struggled to take his last respiratory distress filled breath, I will never forget that image...

Having taken the puppies, I assumed personal responsibility for their livelihood which included the basics of proper shelter, food and water. The responsibility does not end there however and having organized and participated in numerous high volume spay/neuter campaigns, I am aware that the basics also include treatment for both external and internal parasites and vaccinations. I cannot explain why I didn't give more serious consideration to the latter...possibly because they appeared to be quite healthy to begin with? Possibly because there is no readily available professional Veterinary care here on Andros? I don't know. Neither do I know if vaccination and de-worming would have saved them the agony of the deaths they experienced. I had to bury four precious lives in my care. That I know and it saddens me deeply to think of it.
I decided to allow Airport Dog to have her pups knowing that when I returned, I could attend to her. My plan was to find the puppies and take them from her when they were old enough to wean and work towards finding good homes for them. Then, I could then catch her, have her spayed then if she could not be homed, release her. Trap, neuter and return (TNR) is a extremely humane approach to reducing the stray and feral populations, an approach that Baark! fully advocates and supports.

For those doing the math, I have accounted for the four when there were six. lil Bruder #3 had been adopted before the others had taken ill and now is living with his new pal and loving family in the U.S. Sista who was unaffected by what ever had taken her siblings, took Bruder's place on the plane that afternoon and is well and in foster care in New Providence.

I have learned since that Airport Dog was an owned Dog from here in Cargill Creek and that she was dumped between Bowen Sound and the Fresh Creek Airport (a ten mile stretch of uninhabited highway) because she was having too many puppies! There is a relatively inexpensive solution to that problem, Spay/Neuter. Had I decided to capture "Airport Dog" in the first place, none of the ensuing suffering would have occurred, not for the puppies, not for me or those who tried to help me.
 
The story of the 'Airport dog' emphasizes how paramount the Baark! spay and neuter initiatives are not only in Nassau, but the Family Islands as well.  Most of the remote family islands do not have a regular vet service let alone a full time vet, so this story is sadly far too common.  
 RG

The spay and neuter initiatives that have been done so far in Andros, Eleuthera, Abaco, San Salvador are also expanding the reach of animal welfare.  Networks are built when our Nassau experts travel and work with local animal lovers and correspondence continues .  Rick Goodlander got involved in animal welfare when Baark! first went to Andros and is now a very active member of Baark! and does a lot for the animals in Andros.  The voice for animals is getting louder and we are proud to say that we are closer to achieving our mission.  Local Nassau vets are starting to 'adopt' islands and visiting them on a more frequent basis.  We hope that in the coming 5 years, with more young Bahamian Vets returning vet care on the family islands will continue to expand, and in turn the reduction of unnecessary suffering of dogs and cats on these remote islands.  It is very clear that spay and neuter is the answer to reducing the unnecessary suffering that so many little souls are born into.  

Monday, 2 September 2013

Baark! Sponsors Kids Summer Camp


On Monday 28th July I made my way to East St at 8 am to meet a group of children for the first time. These kids had got to know the Operation Potcake volunteers in January, when they held the clinic at the Junkanoo Music Makers shack on Fowler St. Luckily a resident spotted us and helped myself and Tali round all the kids up. Tali, who was an original East St Operation Potcake volunteer, had recruited the kids the week before. We then boarded a mini bus and drove the short distance to the Humane Society.


From the outset, the children were all very well behaved and listened well, despite being very excited! The older ones would look out for the younger ones and correct them if they thought it necessary. Their ages ranged from 6 to 13. This was to be the pattern every day, however, we did have some new faces join us during the week and others who didn’t show up for the whole week. The kids told me about one boy, who came on Monday and Tuesday, when he didn’t show up on Wednesday I enquired if anyone knew why. It transpired he was being punished by his mother for stealing  $10. The next day they told me he was seen setting off firecrackers behind the Surrey horses that were kept in their neighbourhood. I was saddened by this news and wondered why he would do that after attending two days of the camp, where the children learn about being kind, considerate and respectful towards animals. I considered whether if he had attended the full week, whether it may have influenced his future behaviour? And whether his mother realized that there may have been longer term consequences of keeping him home instead of letting him attend camp, when it came to his treatment of animals.

Anyway, there were 13 children who consistently attended the whole week and you knew by talking to them that they were aware of what was right and wrong when it came to the correct treatment and care of animals. What you can only hope, after spending a week educating them and leading by example, is that when the opportunity presents itself, they make the right choices and treat others as you would have yourself treated, our mantra for the week.

The children were a joy to spend time with and they were certainly very appreciative of all the yummy snacks of Go Ahead Cookies and Jumex Juices. Lunches that were generously provided by KFC, Chive Café, Goodfellow Farms, Subway and on Friday we took the kids to Sbarro for pizza! In fact we would look forward to lunch time, as it was when the children were at their quietest with their mouths otherwise occupied! Some of them even got the chance to try home made lasagna for the first time, putting away way more food than we imagined physically possible!!

During their time at the Humane Society, they watched videos and took part in many discussions regarding the animals that we share the planet with. Then they got the opportunity to put their new found knowledge into practice around the shelter, walking the dogs every day, grooming horses, bathing puppies and adult dogs, playing with kittens and cats and feeding ducks and rabbits. They even got an opportunity to make their own individual cat toy, an activity that they approached with great gusto and creativity! Our BHS hosts for the week were Donna, Caroline and Linda, with other volunteers helping out, including a young man called Calvin from British Columbia, Canada, who was on vacation in the Bahamas visiting family and chose to spend his week helping us out! On the last day we gave all the kids an 'Animals are our Friends" T-shirt and a fun bag containing lots of animal goodies and educational products to help them continue learning about animal care as they returned home.

It was definitely a worthwhile venture, making a difference in the lives of those children, to hopefully be advocates for animal welfare in their communities and amongst their peers. Custom Computers, Think Simple, PIC Insurance, Micronet and NUA Insurance contributed to camp fees. We hope to repeat this annually, with the continued support of all our sponsors and private donors, without whom none of this would be possible.

By Shelley Hardman,
Baark Volunteer

Please spay and neuter your pets.

By ensuring your animal cannot produce more litters you are saving lives and decreasing the suffering of unwanted animals.  Please consider donating or helping with Baark!’s efforts to improve animal welfare in the Bahamas.

For more information contact us at info@baarkbahamas.org or (427-SPAY)






Wednesday, 21 August 2013

Baark! On Baark Needs you!


 
 
Baark Needs you!

 

Most of us appreciate the look of a sweet potcake puppy, the sound of a happy cat purring or the feel of a grateful rescued dog leaning into the palm of your hand for a pet, but is this enjoyment enough to make a difference?  Baark! works hard year round with spay and neutering campaigns. We are a very active force for good in our beloved Bahamas and we are making a difference. But we still need your help. We are run by a team of volunteers, who are motivated and energetic about seeing this through but we can always use more help.  This letter is not a plea for funds, although we will never turn away donations of any size! This letter is to get you to think how you might be useful in helping our Bahamas become a more humane place for the animals that live here.

We need people with a conscious, in all our neighborhoods to be willing to stand up and speak out on behalf on the animals that cannot do it for themselves. To report the abuse and neglect of animals, to educate those around you about proper animal care, and suggest the spay or neutering of the animals.

We need people with extra water bowls to provide for the homeless animals everyday with fresh water and food. We need people with yard space to help provide shelters for the animals or a compassionate home to foster the special cases we come across during our stray busting days.

We need educators, leaders and parents to be the example for the future generation of Bahamians. To show how to respect all living creatures and provide kindness and care for the ones who cannot help themselves. Be the person you want your kids to be, start now.

Baark! needs your help, however small or large you can give, whether time, talent or money, we need your help curb the population of unwanted and uncared for animals on the streets of Nassau.

We need you, end of story. Please consider helping in any way you can. Bahamas will be a better place for it

 

Please spay and neuter your animals.

By ensuring your animal cannot produce more litters you are saving lives and decreasing the suffering of unwanted animals.  Please consider donating or helping with Baark!’s efforts to improve animal welfare in the Bahamas.

For more information contact us at info@baarkbahamas.org or (427-SPAY)

Wednesday, 14 August 2013

Baark!On. Misguided reasons for adopting a pet #2


 
 
All the wrong reasons: a series of common misguided reasons why people want a pet.

 

So you are thinking about welcoming a pet into your home! Congratulations. We want your adoption to go as smoothly as possible so we have created a series over the next few weeks based on some of the wrong reasons why people adopt a pet. We are not trying to discourage you; we would love every home to have a pet that is loved, respected and part of a family. The purpose of this series is simply to get you to stop and think seriously before you make a decision. Why does Baark! care? We constantly come across discarded, neglected and homeless animals that began their life as pets. It breaks our hearts and goes against our mandate of creating a more humane Bahamas.

 
Misguided Reason Number Two.
 
Getting a dog will help me find someone to date.


Wrong!! Give your head a shake. Dog or cats are not decorations, they are living beings with real needs. To be toted or paraded around while you hope to catch that someone specials eye forces them into the role of an accessory and gives them none of the respect they deserve.

 

We have to be honest, we are biased but firmly believe that humans who love and respect their animals make the best catches. BUT this has to come naturally and not because you want to establish certain look. Learning to love a pet does not come from the pet store it comes from learning the ins and outs of daily caring for your animals. That is the kind of love that makes a person more attractive to others, not the store bought, diamond encrusted collared, dog you just keep in your purse. 

Ladies, there is no way using an animal will help you look better, chances are you shine beautifully without accessories, be yourself, find someone who loves you just because you are not because of what you own.

 

Now, men. Do you really believe that the supersized pittie or rottie you walk around with gives you a look that women go gaga over? And why must you always have such tough names for them like killer or rage? Watching you parade your almost out of control, unfixed massive dog through your park or neighbourhood drives us crazy..and not with desire. You look ridiculous and are obviously compensating for what you feel you lack on your own. Let us let you in on a real secret, ladies like real men, who have weakness and can admit them. We like genuine conversations about real topics, but we cannot have one if you are always trying to look like you are controlling some “beast” of a dog. Forgo getting a big dog for the ladies, be yourself, be real and see what happens.

 

 

Please spay and neuter your animals.

By ensuring your animal cannot produce more litters you are saving lives and decreasing the suffering of unwanted animals.  Please consider donating or helping with Baark!’s efforts to improve animal welfare in the Bahamas.

For more information find us on the web at www.baarkbahamas.com or call us (427-SPAY)

 

 

Wednesday, 7 August 2013

Baark!On. Misguided reasons for adopting a pet #1




All the wrong reasons: a series of common misguided reasons why people want a pet.

 

So you are thinking about welcoming a pet into your home! Congratulations. We want your adoption to go as smoothly as possible so we have created a series over the next few weeks based on some of the misguided reasons why people adopt a pet. We are not trying to discourage you; we would love every home to have a pet that is loved, respected and part of a family. The purpose of this series is simply to get you to stop and think seriously before you make a decision. Why does Baark! care? We constantly come across discarded, neglected and homeless animals that began their life as pets. It breaks our hearts and goes against our mandate of creating a more humane Bahamas.

 

Misguided Reason Number One

 
My kids will not stop asking for a pet.. I give in.

 

Let’s be honest, put your hand up right now if you know of a family who got a pet for their child because they promised to take care of it and now the parents of the family are the primary care giver of that animal? I would guess about 100% of you just put up your hands. This is what happens, you get the dog on the promise that your child will tend to its every need, then their interest in the dog fizzles as soon as the care for it becomes a chore. But the story does not end her, who do you think will be caring for the dog now that the child is no longer interested and no longer following through with its care?  You. That is right, you.

If this happens you have two not so great scenarios. The first being you stick to the prearranged consequence and remove the animal from the house, believing and rightly so that this will teach the child a lesson. You feel proud for following through on your prearranged consequence, but in reality it is the animal in this scenario that is the most punished, first it is not fair that a life can be used as a teaching lesson, second it is not the animal who failed, it was the people, but it is the animal that suffers the most.

The second scenario, you (the adult) are stuck taking care of an animal you never really wanted, and become bitter and resentful therefore not doing your best for the animal. Once again, it is the animal that pays the highest price, often of neglect or indifference. The animal was clear, it came with basic needs that it cannot do for itself; there really should have been no surprise with this one.

Bottom line in this misguided reason: If your kids want and animal please make sure you want one too. Getting any type of pet is NOT a way to teach your child responsibilities.  The pet suffers, and your child fails to learn a lesson.  It is your parenting skills that will teach your child by modeling how to be responsible. If you do consider bringing home a pet, be realistic with the delegation the work load and the responsibility required of the various people in your family. Make it a family decision, not just one that a child makes for you.

 

 

Please spay and neuter your animals.

By ensuring your animal cannot produce more litters you are saving lives and decreasing the suffering of unwanted animals.  Please consider donating or helping with Baark!’s efforts to improve animal welfare in the Bahamas.

For more information find us on the web at www.baarkbahamas.com or call us (427-SPAY)

 

Wednesday, 31 July 2013

Baark! On: Potcakes vs. Pure Breeds







 

Whenever we talk to people about spay or neutering their animals, most are in total agreement. The idea of operation potcake which took place last year and helped alter 2,315 animals here in Nassau was well received and highly supported. We found that most people, even non animal lovers are in favor of lowering the number of “nuisance animals” here on the island. By nuisance animals they mean the potcakes that litter the streets, homeless and abused. But when we asked them if they had spayed or neutered their animal, we get a different story. “No, my dog is a pure breed, I cannot spay her!”


We have to ask it; why is there such a difference of opinion when it involves sterilizing potcakes vs. pure bred dogs? 



We have heard the excuse pure bred dogs are so much cuter than potcakes. Sorry, but have you seen a potcake puppy, and can you claim any sense of originality in the look of a pure bred? There are similarities for our Bahamian Potcakes but each one offers a unique look, we are sure there is one at the Humane society for you! 

Another reason we encounter for not spaying or neutering their pure bred animals is because the person has intentions of breeding the animal to sell the puppies or kittens. They firmly believe that they will be able to sell every animal that is produced and therefore do not believe they are adding to our stray dog population. This is simply not true, there are many pure bred animals that end up on the streets or shelters because they not able to be sold and then are simple discarded.


 Please encourage your friends and family to spay and neuter their dogs and cats, all of them – pure breeds and potcakes alike. Consider adopting not shopping for your next dog or cat, the difference starts with you and the stance you take in your family.


Please spay and neuter your animals.- All your animals!

By ensuring your animal cannot produce more litters you are saving lives and decreasing the suffering of unwanted animals.  Please consider donating or helping with Baark!’s efforts to improve animal welfare in the Bahamas.

For more information contact us at info@baarkbahamas.org or (427-SPAY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, 10 July 2013

Baark! On: Our Weekly Sunday Dog walk






 

Every Sunday afternoon at 4:30pm, Baark! organizes a dog walk for all the dogs in the Bahamas Humane Society shelter.

Volunteers arrive with leashes in hand to take the eager dogs out for a much needed walk around their neighborhood. The dogs have spent most of the week in their kennels and are needless to say, more than excited to get going. Once the leash is in place, the dogs pull and the humans lead all in a blur of excitement.


There is a slight chaos that continues for 10 minutes at the start with everything needing to be sniffed at and examined by the curious canine nose. But soon after, the dogs settle into the walk and a calm to comes over them. It was almost as if they remember how to be a dog. Nose the ground, tongues hanging out and the occasional grateful look back towards the human walking them. The tails however are the most noticeable. Wagging tails everywhere, such happiness, such joy for these wonderful beings.

Without volunteers they would unfortunately be stuck in their cages. All it took was the ability to open the cage, but it was not something that the dogs could do for themselves. A cage was holding these dogs back until the doors were opened, allowing them the space to be the fabulous dogs they were meant to be.

Life in a shelter, while keeping them alive and safe is hard for dogs. Dogs tend to be more stressed and often have a hard time gaining weight and keeping their coat healthy. All due to stress, The staff at the shelter do amazing jobs with such care but the bottom line is that it is not a natural place for an animal to be and therefore stressful.

Why does Baark! do this? Because although our primary focus is our spay and neuter programs we recognize there are many dogs that still require a forever home and deserve to live with respect and compassion. We support the Bahamas Humane Society’s massive efforts to take in needy and helpless animals. We want to help the dogs find their homes and believe that helping them socialize around safe humans is one way to help them with successful adoptions.


Baark! is proud to provide this small but important service to the amazing dogs at the Bahamas Humane Society. Please consider joining us on Sundays at 4:30pm for this marvelous hour of dog walking.

Please spay and neuter your animals, this simple procedure saves lives and decreases the suffering of unwanted animals.

This column is proudly brought to you by BAARK!

The Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness

For more information contact us at info@baarkbahamas.org, (427.SPAY) or visit our website www.baarkbahamas.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, 3 July 2013

Baark! On: Junior Straybusters Report!


Written By St Andrews School students: Emily Wilson and Hope Nevins

 
For our St Andrews School vocational experience we had the amazing opportunity to work with Shelley and Baark (Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness) to help spay or neuter dogs. This is a free service for strays and pet owners who cannot afford to pay for it themselves. Throughout the course of three days we have gained new knowledge and understanding of this amazing non-profit organization and the treatment of animals in this country.   

On the first day of the vocational we went straybusting with Shelley in the South Beach community. We met lots of new faces, both dogs and humans. To begin, we visited a location with five potcakes that had to be spayed and neutered to avoid unwanted litters of puppies. Trapping the dogs humanely and lifting them in the van was a challenging but we were able to get the job done. We then continued down the street and met Ricardo, the interesting yet loving owner of two beautiful potcake puppies. We were able to take the pups for their first vaccinations and worming, another service Baark provides in addition to spaying, to prevent the spread of fatal puppy diseases. In the same neighbourhood we met 4 additional dogs that required Baark’s assistance.  

The following day we collected the dogs from the vet after their surgery. The dogs were all given wormer and vaccinations. Unfortunately, one puppy was suffering from jaundice caused by leptospirosis and had to be euthanized as he was going downhill rapidly. The dog was contaminated from the urine and feces of rats, this disease results in the yellowing of the skin and gums. This personally affected us both, and highlighted the importance of puppy shots! 

During the course of our days we observed some poor conditions that dogs are kept in, including being chained, not fed properly, or having adequate shelter. We were not expecting to see this. However it was a surprise to see that these dogs can still be friendly despite what humans have done to them. It is heartbreaking to witness the human neglect that these poor dogs go through. However thanks to Baark! and the Bahamas Humane Society, a lot of these dogs get the help that they need, whether it’s rescue or working with their owners to improve their situation.

 The last three days have been extremely fun even though we’ve been through a lot. Some aspects have truly broken our hearts, but thanks to Shelley and the BAARK team we know there is hope for other dogs. Shelley and other Baark volunteers give a new meaning to the term “dog lovers”. We owe them a lot for what they spend their days doing without getting paid, it’s truly inspiring and we hope one day we can be as empathic and caring as they are

 

Please spay and neuter your animals, this simple procedure saves lives and decreases the suffering of unwanted animals.

This column is proudly brought to you by BAARK! the Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness.

For more information contact us at info@baarkbahamas.org, (427.SPAY) or visit our website www.baarkbahamas.com

Wednesday, 26 June 2013

Baark! On: Potcake Paradise found in Middle of Crowded Centerville!


 
 


 

 On a street in Nassau, is a little piece of paradise right smack in the middle of a bustling neighborhood. Sidney Knowles the owner of Knowles Upholstering and Diane Knowles the owner of Security Forwarding service are neighboring businesses that have taken it upon themselves to create a safe place for dogs that were roaming the neighborhood. They have created a potcake paradise in a place where there is little tolerance for the homeless potcakes.


The space between their businesses once used for garbage and storage now has a small shade garden and a shelter. It is a safe place to rest while the rest of the world continues around them in chaos and danger. 


There are always full water bowls and once a day they bring out food, making sure all the dogs that frequent the space are fed for the day.  

 

 

There are at least 10 potcakes that frequent this establishment. All the dogs have been spayed or neutered, 7 of them through Baark!’s spay and neuter program.  The remaining three dogs were paid for by Diane and Sidney out of pocket. One of the dogs, “Big Daddy” was responsible for fathering many litters before they had him neutered. Now thanks to a quick procedure, Big Daddy is no longer contributing to the unwanted and homeless population of potcakes roaming the street.

 


I asked Mr. Knowles about the response of his customers to these dogs. He said it was overwhelmingly positive. 9 out of 10 of the customers loved it and thought it was a fabulous thing he was doing. I can just hear someone giving directions to his store, it is on Madeira, just across from Centerville food store; you know, the place with all the dogs.  I would venture a guess that this beautiful undertaking has helped both businesses as they promote animal welfare.

 


As I spoke with Sidney and Diane about their little spot of kindness in this world, both of their eyes lit with excitement. “If everyone does something, it all adds up to a lot” said Diane as she explains the joy of making a difference for these dogs. Sidney described helping the dogs as self-gratifying, “it just feels good to do something good.” 

 


 

As we walked around the space between the two businesses, Diane said “we are doing the best we can, there are just so many that need help- it is overwhelming.”  In agreement Sidney nodded and added “We cannot give them the longest life possible but we can give them a better quality life.” It would have been so easy for these two people to look the other way and choose not to see the poor condition of the animals but they did not , instead they made a choice to care and by doing do make a difference We too are faced with a choice every day. Do we look the other way or do we find something, anything that we can do to make a difference? Let the story of these two businesses and their wonderful potcake paradise inspire you to choose today to make a difference in the lives of our Bahamian animals

 

Please spay and neuter your animals.

By ensuring your animal cannot produce more litters you are saving lives and decreasing the suffering of unwanted animals.  Please consider donating or helping with Baark!’s efforts to improve animal welfare in the Bahamas.

For more information contact us at info@baarkbahamas.org or (427-SPAY)